Costa Concordia Saga Comes to an End

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  • As HRAS Tanker Crew’s Basic Human Rights Breached

The dismantling and recycling of the Costa Concordia cruise ship, one of the most important green ship recycling projects ever carried out in Europe, has been finalized in Genoa, according to the Ship Recycling Consortium.

The project was concluded by Italian shipyard San Giorgio del Porto, in partnership with Saipem, less than three years after the ship wreck arrived in Genoa in July 2014.

Up to 350 workers were involved since the start of the dismantling operation which lasted around 1 million effective work hours.

Total recycled material amounted to over 53,000 tons for almost 4,000 trips to recycling facilities in Italy, while the dismantled material amounted to 8,000 tons with over 850 trips to dismantling facilities.

At the beginning of September 2016, the cruise ship’s wreck departed on its final voyage when it sailed to Genoa’s dry dock. The vessel was stripped bare as its internal fitting was removed and its decks were cut after it was moved from its grounding place off the Island of Giglio to the Port of Genoa in 2014.

The Concordia incident, which occurred in January 2012, took the lives of 32 people out of a total of 4,252 who were aboard the ship at the time. The grounding of the cruise ship was believed to had been caused by the captain’s recklessness, as the ship came too close to the Giglio island where it got stuck and later collapsed.

Meanwhile, the crew members aboard the UAE-flagged products tanker MT IBA, owned by Alco Shipping Services, have had their basic human rights breached, according to a report released by Human Rights at Sea (HRAS).

The seafarers, comprising nine Indian, three Pakistani, one Sri Lankan and one Myanmarian national, have been deprived of liberty, lack protection of their health and bodily integrity, lack protection of their right to life, and lack family life due to their enforced retention on the MT IBA.

HRAS informed that the crew are currently stranded on an unsafe vessel, anchored off the coast of UAE. Their safety has allegedly been compromised by the provision of unfit Personal Protective Equipment, and they have repeatedly been left without fresh food or fresh water.

Additionally, for the last six months the crew have been denied access to medical treatment and have been without pay during the same period.

“We are not being paid for last 6 months…now captain and company is threatening to all crew, that crew have to face consequences… Our life and career is in danger… The men need to be repatriated,” the crew said.

HRAS added that the crew allege that after raising the safety concerns with Alco Shipping, “they have been repeatedly threatened with criminal proceedings should they report their concerns to a local authority.”

“Human Rights at Sea will continue to publicly document and publish cases of the abuse of seafarers wherever this occurs in the world so that the international community have the facts,” David Hammond, CEO of Human Rights at Sea, said.

“We aim, that by ensuring such poor conditions are objectively highlighted, our evidenced-based approach will trigger formal public condemnation and resultant action by the IMO, ILO and the flag State administration at the very least. Silence and inaction are no longer an option from established shipping bodies,” Hammond added.

World Maritime News

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