Army rescue 46 captives, destroy fortified Boko Haram camp in Sambisa

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…As 136 Nigerians evacuated from Libya arrive Port Harcourt***

The Nigerian Army on Tuesday said its troops had rescued 46 captives and destroyed a highly fortified Boko Haram insurgents’ camp deep inside Sambisa forest as part of its ongoing “clearance operation” .

Col. Onyeama Nwachukwu, the Deputy Director, Army Public Relations, “Operation Lafiya Dole”,  disclosed this in a statement issued in Maiduguri.

Nwachukwu said that the troops under Operation Deep Punch II penetrated deep into the forest and cleared all known insurgents’ enclaves including a fortified ‘Sabil Huda’ camp.

He said that the troops neutralised several insurgents, destroyed various makeshift accommodation and recovered high calibre ammunition.

“On Monday Feb.12, 2018 the troops dislodged Boko Haram terrorists from one of their highly fortified hideouts around S-Shape part of the Sambisa forest close to Sabil Huda, believed to be one of their prized hideouts.

“During the fierce offensive supported by Nigerian Air Force, the resilient troops neutralised quite a number of Boko Haram terrorists and captured major armaments including two Spartan Armoured Personnel Carriers (APCs), one truck and one laptop computer belonging to the insurgents.

“The gallant troops also destroyed 8 gun trucks; several tents, rescued 19 women and 27 children from the enclave”.

Meanwhile, the fifth batch of 136 Nigerian returnees from Libya arrived Port Harcourt International Airport in the early hours of Tuesday, Mr Martins Ejike, South-South Zonal Coordinator, National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), has said.

Ejike, represented by Mr Ebhodaghe Eric, NEMA Chief Administrative Officer, received the returnees who arrived aboard Med-View Airline 5N-MAB at about 1.10 a.m.

“They are all intact, except one of them who we are taking to the hospital with the ambulance to find out why she is unstable,” he said.

Ejike said that few returnees in the fourth batch were still left at the centre, adding that they are from Osun and Ekiti states.

He appealed to concerned state governments to hasten the process of picking their indigenes.

Ejike said the agency would contact state governors for prompt evacuation of the returnees from the fifth batch in the Port Harcourt centre.

Joy Job, one of the returnees, thanked the Federal Government for rescuing them and fulfilling its promise of bringing Nigerians home.

Job described her experience in Libya as “horrible, sorrowful and unforgettable.’’

She said that she was sold into slavery by a Nigerian who told her that he found a hair dressing work for her in Kano, not knowing that she had been sold into slavery to another Nigerian living in Libya.

“Nigerians are selling fellow Nigerians into slavery in Libya; we are sold from one person to another, Libya people will buy us from our people and use us for any kind of work they like.

“I did not know that where I was in Kano was a boundary between Nigeria and another country until I saw myself surrounded with gun.

“My abductors told me that if I did not agree to go to Libya, they will kill me, so I had no option than to agree with them.

” They gave us Nigerian account numbers to pay in the money they charged us before they freed us from their custody,” she said.

Job advised Nigerian youths still nursing the idea of travelling out of the country illegally to drop it and manage life with whatever they see in the country.

She appealed to  the Federal Government to continue with the evacuation in order to save many Nigerians who were still in different prisons and camps in Libya.