Accidents

Passengers burnt beyond recognition in Anambra accident — FRSC

Passengers burnt beyond recognition in Anambra accident — FRSC
Written by Maritime First

Mr Andrew Kumapayi, the Anambra State Sector Commander of the Federal Road Safety Corps, said on Sunday that many passengers were burnt beyond recognition when their vehicle went into flames on the Ihiala/Onitsha road in Anambra State.

Kumapayi said that they were yet to know the actual number of people that died in the accident because they were burnt beyond recognition.

“This evening, a lone fatal road traffic crash was allegedly caused by tyre burst as a result of excessive speeding. The vehicle somersaulted and burst into flames.

“Information reaching the Command states that all passengers on board were burnt beyond recognition, along with the bus.

“The Anambra State fire service has been contacted and the FRSC rescue team from Ihiala Unit Command are on ground to ensure free flow of traffic, while all obstructions are being cleared,” he said.

Kumapayi said that the corpse of the only male adult who jumped out of the vehicle in the process had been deposited at the Morgue at Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital in Ihiala.

Also read: OGUN: Road accidents claim 109 lives, within 8 months

He added that there would be more updates as events unfold.

Egyptian Tourism and Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Anany (C) and Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA) Mostafa Waziri (R) look at a 2,500-year-old coffin discovered in Giza, Egypt, on Sept. 6, 2020. (Xinhua photo)

However, in another development, Egypt has announced the discovery of a collection of more than 13 intact sealed coffins, dating back to 2,500 years ago.

The coffins were found at an archaeological site in Saqqara necropolis in Giza, said the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities in a statement.

The coffins, along with three sealed niches, were unearthed inside an 11-meter-deep shaft, according to the statement.

Egyptian Tourism and Antiquities Minister, Khaled al-Anany and Mostafa Waziri, Secretary-General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA), visited the site on Sunday and inspected the excavation work in the shaft.

“The discovery marks the largest number of coffins found in one burial place since the discovery of the Asasif Cachette,’’ the minister said, referring to the discovery of 30 ancient coffins in October 2019 at Asasif cemetery in Upper Egypt’s Luxor Province.

“The discovery in Saqqara includes a wonderful collection of coloured wooden coffins whose colours and inscriptions are still in a good condition despite the passage of 2,500 years,’’ Waziri, who leads the Egyptian archaeological mission in Saqqara, told Xinhua.

Waziri said the exact number of the unearthed coffins, as well as the identity and titles of their owners, have not yet been determined.

But, he added, they will be found out in the coming few days as the excavation work still continues.

“The mission continues excavation work on the site and it is expected to result in many other new discoveries of shafts, coloured wooden coffins and statues,’’ the SCA chief added.

Initial studies revealed that the coffins are completely sealed and have not been opened since they were buried inside the shaft, according to the ministry.

 

 

 

Additional reports from Xinhua

 

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